Introducing The Crisis Management Advisor on Google Helpouts

I’m thrilled to be selected by Google this month as the first Crisis Management advisor on the new platform known as Helpouts. Helpouts allows me to counsel clients around the world with high resolution video that also allows us to share screens and collaborate. It’s been made so easy to make an online appointment and to pay for your time with me, either by the minute or by the session.

I look forward to meeting and advising individuals, companies and organizations facing crisis situations in 2014 and beyond using this great tool.

On the Helpout, I’ll quickly gauge the seriousness of your crisis, make recommendations and then get to work on the process of protecting your reputation.

That can take the form of creating sharp content that influences public opinion, helping to identify the right spokespeople, conducting media training for mock interviews and news conferences, teaching you how to deal with the media and how to use social media at all stages of a crisis (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube and more).

Remember – a few hundred dollars spent on a Helpout could save millions of dollars of lost revenue due to a crisis situation that catches you and your organization off guard and that could destroy goodwill and hard-earned reputation.

High Stakes Litigation & Crisis Communications: What Companies Need To Know

Here’s a short promo of my upcoming online panel discussion on Wednesday, March 24th.

Here’s a link to listen in to the show on Blog Talk Radio:
High Stakes Litigation & Crisis Communications: What Companies Need to Know

Guests: Michele D. Beardslee, associate professor, University of Miami School of Law and Jonathan Bernstein of Bernstein Crisis Management.

Professor Michele D. Beardslee

Jonathan Bernstein

New Study: Corporate Lawyers Can No Longer Separate Legal Strategy from PR Activities

Here’s Part 1 of a new study on corporate counsel and litigation public relations, courtesy of Michele DeStefano Beardslee, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law.

Her project “investigates the emerging trend of general counsels acting as legal PR managers for legal issues facing large publicly traded corporations and the potential impact that the eroding distinction between legal advice and PR management could have on the legal profession.”

In the opening, Professor Beardslee writes:

“Today legal controversies are tried in the “court” of public opinion as much as in any court of law. Corporate lawyers’ traditional tendency, however, has been to attempt to compartmentalize legal activities from public relations activities. Accordingly, they have viewed media considerations as separate from those involved in providing legal advice, and corporate lawyers’ typical media strategy often has consisted of no more than “no comment.” Given today’s saturated media culture, this is no longer a viable strategy. Indeed, there are indications that some corporate lawyers are adapting to the new media environment and attempting to help their clients manage the public relations impact of legal
controversies. ”

I could not agree more with Professor Beardslee’s summary and hope this study stimulates wider discussion among corporate attorneys, outside law firms and those in marketing and public relations who advise corporate clients and the law firms.

The full study will appear in the Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics.