The Crisis Show Library on Audio Now Rolling Out

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Today we’re proud to begin the rollout of The Crisis Show Library on audio. It will consist of nearly all 100 episodes of The Crisis Show that began production in June 2012 and running through Spring 2015.

We are rolling out 20 of our favorite shows this weekend on a wide variety of topics: natural disasters/emergency management, social media crises, health crises, CEO leadership and workplace violence to name a few.

For the past three years, we’ve put much effort into making the show about crisis management education from many angles. And we’ve attracted some of the best minds in the business around the globe as guests — all who have given much of their time to deliver information viewers/listeners can use immediately. I thank them!

The show has mostly been broadcast live (with some pre-recorded the same day) to deliver up-to-date analysis of high profile crises: Newtown, CT school shooting, Superstorm Sandy, Australia brushfires, a Brazil nightclub tragedy, a horsemeat scandal that swept Europe, virus outbreaks on cruise ships, deadly tornadoes and earthquakes, the Boston Marathon bombing and major transportation disasters around the world.

We’ve covered CEOS, world leaders, college presidents and celebrities involved in recalls, scandals, crimes, natural/manmade disasters and reputation crises.

This Crisis Show was born on Google Hangouts on Air/YouTube and you can still watch the videos there. But having high resolution audio files that can be easily played in your car, tablets/iPads and mobile phones makes it more accessible than ever. (Note: My guitar hero Jimmy Page was NOT available to produce the audios but they still sound pretty darn good:))

Most episodes will cost $2.99 with a few at $3.99 because of their extra time/file size and additional guests. These include our special “Back to School” episodes and some “anniversary” editions that include mini All-Star teams of crisis management packed into extended shows.

If you ultimately purchased the entire library at say $299, that’s still cheaper than what you would pay today for a one or two hour webinar or seminar. So, in my humble opinion, every episode we make available is a fabulous value and costs less than most fancy coffees. Caffeine aside, this information WILL help you sleep at night because you will quickly gain confidence in your ability — and your staff’s ability — to manage a serious crisis that can ruin your organizations reputation.

We’re using a platform called Gumroad and hope you find it easy to use for purchasing and downloading your files from The Crisis Show Library. But if you have any issues with it, just email me: rich@richkleincrisis.com or TheCrisisShow@gmail.com. You can also DM me on Twitter via @RichKleinCrisis and @TheCrisisShow.

Thanks to everyone around the world who has watched and supported the show the past three years.

And thanks in advance to those ready to buy our audio episodes.

You will certainly learn much about what to do and say before, during and after a crisis to protect hard-earned reputation in front of your critical audiences.

PS…We don’t want to break the Internet by rolling out all episodes at once so please be patient as we spread these out over the coming week.

 

Sound Bite That Bit The President

Last week, President Obama was answering questions at a news conference. And one short sentence got him in big trouble in the court of public opinion. 

I wrote about this in a post on LinkedIn just now.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140903040308-6790863-the-big-bad-soundbite-that-bit-the-president

 

Princeton University Statement on Meningitis Vaccine

Tonight, I received the following statement from Martin A. Mbugua, director of media relations at Princeton University, regarding reports  late today that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) was considering the use of emergency doses of a meningitis vaccine (not approved for use in the U.S.)  to halt an outbreak of the potentially deadly infection that has sickened seven students since March of this year.

“This is a question we have been considering very carefully. We will be discussing it with our trustees this weekend, and when we have something to announce we will make an announcement.”
The statement was emailed after I asked if the new college president, Christopher L. Eisgruber, had issued any statement about the development. He hadn’t and I was asked to attribute the above statement to the college spokesperson.
Sure, it’s a good idea to discuss critical health issues with the Board of Trustees.
But President Eisgruber needs to show more immediate leadership on this issue, especially to calm campus fears and thousands of parents about the outbreak – even if he has already done that days, weeks and months earlier.
In today’s crisis world, it’s not enough to lean on your past statements. Information moves too quickly and changes too often (today was great example with CDC action) to rely on past statements.
I applaud the college director of media relations for his quick response to my request. But clearly his hands are being tied by a Board of Trustees (and maybe some legal counsel) that doesn’t allow for a statement attributed to the college president that shows the Ivy League school is treating this with the utmost urgency.

Rutgers, Barchi & What Organizations Can Learn About The Crisis Domino Effect

“Division I athletics are probably the best marketing tool we have in terms of getting the Rutgers’ name out there,” he said. “If they don’t know the name and they haven’t seen the brand, they’re not going to even look at you.” — Robert L. Barchi, Rutgers president, September 4, 2012 in Star-Ledger interview.

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Rutgers President Robert L. Barchi

A story in The New York Times today about Rutgers is a great example of how a crisis in one part of your organization can result in the media covering (or uncovering) bigger problems inside your administration. And that unplanned media attention can severely harm the entire reputation of an institution. I’ve always advised my clients to beware the smoldering fire, that slow-brewing crisis that suddenly envelops your administration (or your business) and brings greater harm to your institutional reputation.

I’ll now call this the Crisis Domino Effect or CDE.  The CDE is akin to that stuffy nose that leads to a cold that leads to a flu that won’t go away for weeks or months. And just like you try to throw everything at the cold (vitamins, OJ, medicines), you may try multiple tactics to rid your campus or business of the unwelcome media barrage – plus the social media inferno that either follows traditional media or motivates reporters to write stories.

You may “decline comment” or even curse at a reporter or editor for writing that story. You may try to put out a wishy washy statement that gets you in even MORE hot water with your critical audiences. Or, you may sincerely try to get the messaging just right, but you fail to convey or attach any human emotion to the spiraling crisis.

Let’s face it. If I’m a parent who a month ago was thinking about sending my child to Rutgers, it’s likely I’m going to revisit that decision in light of the gross mishandling of the belated firing of Mike Rice, the former men’s basketball coach. (As one of my guests on The Crisis Show pointed out this week, if that was his kid getting abused by a coach, he’d be driving to the school to confront that coach personally.)

It’s safe to assume that same parent considering sending their child to Rutgers has heard about the coaching fiasco. Combine that with today’s article –which focuses on numerous other criticisms of President Robert L. Barchi — and good chance I’m crossing Rutgers off the list. That’s why Barchi and Rutgers now have a full blown crisis and are scrambling to stop the bleeding. And as long as Tim Pernetti, the embattled athletic director remains, the loss of reputation won’t stop soon.

The Rutgers lesson is one I’ve seen so many times. A company, campus or other organization thinks it has an isolated HR problem, when in fact it’s much bigger than that. And, as Rutgers is experiencing, by “investigating” instead of “terminating” Rice last year, it now has a much more costly crisis in terms of litigation as well as lost revenue from those parents of prospective students who have now crossed Rutgers off their lists.

It’s also important to note that while this (thankfully) is not as serious as the Sandusky-Paterno-Penn State scandal, the story is similar in that horrible behavior emanating from the athletics department was ignored by college officials for years. Penn State has paid $208,000 per month to a big public relations firm since April 2012 for an engagement that was scheduled to end this month.

When you add up the costs of litigation, lost revenue and the cost to rebuild reputation, it’s clear that eliminating HR problems with decisive, early actions save reputations later –and monies can be spent more intelligently where all students benefit most. What do you think? Please comment below.